Six Tips on How to Start Going Organic

Recently someone left me a question on my contact page saying, “I’ve been following your blog for awhile now and I want to go Organic, but how to start?!” and to answer that — First, THANK YOU so much for reading. Second, I’m so kilig that someone wants to go organic. And third, you inspired me to write a whole post about it!

Recently someone left me a question on my contact page saying, “I’ve been following your blog for awhile now and I want to go Organic, but how to start?!” and to answer that — First, THANK YOU so much for reading. Second, I’m so kilig that someone wants to go organic. And third, you inspired me to write a whole post about it!

Question: I want to go Organic.. but how to start?!

Here are my tips:

1. Have a Purpose

As when starting anything, we must first ask the question, WHY? Why do you want to do it? One main reason why people go organic is because they want to be healthier–and eliminating toxic chemicals in your body will definitely help in achieving your health goals. Another reason is maybe because they are sick, and they need to detox themselves. For others, it may also be that they want to help save the environment.

There are so many possible reasons why you may want to go organic, but just make sure that you are not doing it to follow a “trend”, because I don’t believe that it’s a fad. Do it with a purpose.  Continue reading “Six Tips on How to Start Going Organic”

Does your deodorant contain these toxic ingredients?

Deodorant is an essential product that we use daily. Unfortunately, we are unaware that they are made with toxic ingredients that cause harm to our health.

Here are the Top 3 Toxic Ingredients Found in Deodorants:

1. Aluminum Compounds (Aluminum Chloralhydrate, Aluminum Zirconium Tetrachlorohydrex Gly)

Aluminum is linked to breast, prostate cancer and increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease. These ingredients are used as an antiperspirant because it helps stop the flow of sweat. The downside is that these may be absorbed by the skin, and can promote the growth of breast cancer cells.

 Image result for dove deodorant ingredient

2. Parabens

Parabens act as preservatives but have hormone-disrupting effects. It causes hormonal imbalance, which can lead to things like early puberty in children and an increased risk of hormonal cancers. It is also linked to birth defects and organ toxicity. There are different types of parabens – the top three are Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Butylparaben.

3. Propylene Glycol 

It helps hydrate skin but since it is a byproduct of fossil fuel, it is not healthy for the skin to absorb it. It may cause delayed allergic reactions, and is considered a neurotoxin, which may cause kidney and liver damage.

Image result for secret deodorant ingredient


Most of the common deodorants found in the market today such as Secret, Axe, Dove contain at least one of these ingredients, and we should really be careful in purchasing these products. Take note that if we use them once or a few times, it doesn’t cause any harm, but imagine using these products every day–it will build up and get absorbed into our skin.

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To be safe, I recommend creating your own deodorant. Here’s a DIY Deodorant recipe I found on Pinterest:

Ingredients needed:

  • 1/4 tsp essential oil (recommended: lavender)
  • 1/4 cup cornstarch
  • 1/4 cup baking soda
  • 1/2 cup coconut oil

Instructions:

  1. Melt coconut oil if not yet liquefied.
  2. Transfer it to a mixing bowl, and add the cornstarch and baking soda.
  3. Add essential oil, and mix until completely dissolved.
  4. Transfer into packaging desired.

 


If you don’t have the ingredients or the time to create your own deodorant, I would suggest looking for an organic one. The one I tried using is from a brand called Naturalis, an Italian company that produces chemical free beauty products and essentials, including the Organic Deo Natural. I loved it because 1) it smells good and 2) it’s antiperspirant.

Organicaholic by Mikee FederizoOrganicaholic by Mikee Federizo

Source: http://www.sweatblock.com/blog/how-to-make-natural-deodorant/

Why I Went Organic

I realized I’ve been blogging for a little over a month now, but I haven’t fully shared with you guys why I went organic. This is going to be a little bit of a more personal post but I hope you like it!

I realized I’ve been blogging for a little over a month now, but I haven’t fully shared with you guys why I went organic. This is going to be a little bit of a more personal post but I hope you like it!

My Journey To Going Organic

If I recall correctly, I think I started being mindful of what I eat when I was in late high school, going into college. I remember visiting my cousin Esy in the U.S., who’s a vegetarian (and still is), and one time, we went running together in the park. Man was I surprised because she was so much stronger and faster than me (considering I was already very active that time, going to the gym and playing a lot of sports). That’s when I gave it some thought, maybe it’s with what she was eating. I thought I would give it a try, maybe there would be some changes in my energy and I could do better on my fitness. However,  since I couldn’t drop all meat, I first went pescatarian.

pes·ca·tar·i·an

peskəˈterēən/ noun
a person who does not eat meat but does eat fish.

It was very easy for me. In fact, I think I sustained being a pescatarian for 2 years or more, and I didn’t miss meat at all. Except when… the whole YOLO movement got popular and I thought to myself, hey why am I restricting myself from eating meat? YOLO (You only live once)! …and you know already what happened. This is such a petty reason, I know. But it’s the truth so I wanted to still share it :p

Fast forward to 2015, when I lived in Taiwan. As I mentioned in my previous post, I had a flatmate named Alison who was vegan and she influenced me a lot. No, she wasn’t imposing that I should go vegan, but her lifestyle herself made me curious to actually start researching about it. She recommended a book called Skinny B* and after putting the book down, I was hungry for more information.  I then came across a documentary on Netflix called Cowspiracy and after watching it, I was a changed person. Literally. I became full on health-conscious and started researching about veganism and its impact on the environment. Then I went vegan. Again, it was so easy! I didn’t miss meat at all. Especially in Taiwan, when there are so many vegetarian options available. It was a total switch of mindset and lifestyle. I became mindful of my impact on the environment as well as the people around me. I felt like I was doing something good and it made me feel great.

veg·an

vēɡən/ noun
a person who does not eat or use animal products

veg·e·tar·i·an

vejəˈterēən/ noun
a person who does not eat meat, and sometimes other animal products, especially for moral, religious, or health reasons.

However, when I returned home to the Philippines, things became different.  I realized that there were not a lot of options for me, especially with the busy lifestyle that I had. There were times that I would just choose not to eat, because a) there were no options available and b) I was too busy to go out of my way and actually find or make something to eat. It was not healthy for me anymore. At this point, I was already introduced to the concept of organic food and beauty, and as I did more and more research, I discovered that there is a whole world of chemicals out there. And it’s present in everything I put in and on my body.

That’s when it hit me. THERE IS NO PERFECT DIET. It’s not possible. I put so much thought into what I eat but the truth is, there’s too much process happening before the food reaches my table that I can’t keep up with it anymore. I then dropped being vegan and went back to eating everything, but this time, I focused on being mindful of where my food comes from. This is when I started going organic.

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or·gan·ic

ôrˈɡanik/

(of food or farming methods) produced or involving production without the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, or other artificial agents | synonyms: pesticide-free, additive-free, natural | “organic vegetables”

Out of all the “diets” I tried, I believe that going organic is the healthiest for me. I know that there’s no such thing as a perfect diet. Again, what’s important with organic food is that they are made WITHOUT the use of harmful chemicals, pesticides, additives. You can read more about organic on my previous post, What does organic really mean?. There’s a whole lot of benefits of going organic but I’ll reserve that for another post 🙂

All I can say is… it’s definitely a process. I didn’t just wake up one day and went organic. What’s important is that I’m now at a point in my life (and at an early point, at that) where I am aware and I am thriving. I want to live a long healthy life. Going organic and eliminating toxic chemicals is what I feel is best for me. I’m not gonna stop trying, searching and learning.

Any thoughts? Feel free to share it below!


P.S. I started vlogging! Hope you can show some love by liking and subscribing on my youtube channel Here’s my first video: VLOG#1

Why Women Should Use Organic Down There (Feminine Hygiene)

YEP. This is a topic that we girls often don’t want to talk about since no one wants to mention the “v-word” and its “embarrassing”. But today I would like to share some very important information about feminine hygiene. It is vital for us to be aware of this topic because it concerns our health. So girls, listen (read) up!

Disclaimer: I will mention vagina a lot in this post. 

YEP. This is a topic that we girls often don’t want to talk about since no one wants to mention the “v-word” and its “embarrassing”. I can remember my high school teacher telling our class (I went to an all girls school), “Girls, what do you call your private parts? VAGINA! Not flower! Say it! Vaggggiiiiinaaaaa” and since then we were never uncomfortable anymore whenever we talked about it.

Today I would like to share some very important information about feminine hygiene. It is vital for us to be aware of this topic because it concerns our health. Let’s talk medical and let’s talk scientific. So girls, listen (read) up! 😊

Let’s start with some facts. First, our vaginas are self-cleaning and we don’t really need to “clean” it. Second, it is also supposed to be pH balanced, wherein the pH score is somewhere between 3.5 to 4.5 pH. This means that our potential of hydrogen (pH) is neither acidic nor basic. Third, it is also self-lubricating, meaning there should always be moisture and we shouldn’t feel dry.

But how come we sometimes feel itchy or dry and sometimes, even smell odor coming from it?

The reason behind this is because of something called bacterial vaginosis (BV). This is the effect of having a high pH level, and this causes odor. The problem is that 2 out of 5 women have it, and 84% don’t know they have it. Even bigger problem? Women who have the BV are 60% more susceptible to STDs and HIV infection, and are 3x more likely to infect their male partners.

What do a lot of us do when we feel dry and itchy, or if we smell bad odor coming from our vaginas? We go to the supermarket and buy feminine washes off the shelf. However, what we don’t know is that using these chemical-based feminine washes have a very high concentration of petrochemicals, which increase risk of BV in women up to 13x. For your information, petrochemicals are 30x harsher than tissue, and they suck out all the moisture of your vagina–it actually dries you out. Resulting to our vaginas releasing more odor and us feeling even more itchy. It is truly a vicious cycle if you think about it. We smell bad odor -> we wash it off with a feminine wash -> it smells okay for a while -> it releases bad odor again later on -> we wash it off again …. And this continues on and on until we become used to it being a part of our routines. Furthermore, the colors, fragrances, and chemicals (like parabens and propylene glycol) found in these products are also contributing to bacterial vaginosis.


With this, I’d like to introduce an organic brand I recently came across, called Good Clean Love. They are an American company who are committed to providing natural well-being products and essential educational resources.

Good Clean Love

I tried three of their products—the Balance moisturizing wash, the Rebalance cleansing wipes, and the Restore gel. All of their products do not contain any petrochemicals, but instead, they use natural and organic ingredients and are 100% vegan and gluten-free, biocompatible and recommended by medical professionals.

BALANCE Moisturizing Wash

Good Clean Love

Balance is great for daily use to help pH balance, moisturize and deodorize. First thing I noticed was how fresh I felt after just using it one time. It doesn’t leave you feeling dry at all. In fact, it makes you feel very moisturized, so it’s great for everyday use, and its especially great for menopausal, pregnancy and postpartum. Women who have bacterial vaginosis may also treat it using this wash every day.

REBALANCE Moisturizing & Cleansing Wipes

Good Clean Love

Rebalance is basically like balance, but in wipes form. This is great to carry on-the-go–in our bags, or while we are on travel. Since these are individually wrapped, they maintain their freshness. They also used biodegradable organic cotton which is great for the environment.

Bio-Match™ RESTORE pH Balanced Moisturizing Gel

Good Clean Love

Restore is my favorite. This is a moisturizing personal lubricant–but in my own words, I would call it medicine for your vagina. It helps it to literally RESTORE to its normal state—perfect pH level, salt balance and healthy lubrication and deodorization. You can use this for 3 nights straight the first time, then just 1-2 times per week in the succeeding weeks.

Good Clean Love

CREDITS to the Good Clean Love team for sharing these information, visit their website at www.goodcleanlove.com

Organic certification logos to look for

It is important to know that there are different organizations that can certify products to be organic. The strictness of the rules and regulations may vary from organization to organization since each of them have their own respective standards that they created.

As I mentioned in my first post: What does organic really mean? it is important to know that there are different organizations that can certify products to be organic. The strictness of the rules and regulations may vary from organization to organization since each of them have their own respective standards that they created.

Here are the most popular ones globally:

Organic4colorsealGIF

USDA (U.S.)

USDA is probably the most popular among all certifying bodies since the organic industry is booming the most in the US. They are not as strict when it comes to their rules and regulations, but they have a national list of allowed and prohibited substances (ingredients) that farms or companies must follow. It is also important to know that USDA (U.S. Department of Agriculture) are not the ones doing the certification themselves, but the agencies. USDA also has a set of standards for agencies to be accredited as a certifying body.

Image result for bdih organic

BDIH (Germany)

The strictest rules and regulations are usually always found in Germany. BDIH review each and every raw material and as far as possible, they want them to be obtained from plants. They prohibit ingredients obtained from dead vertebrates (such as animal fats, animal collagen, mink oil, terrapin oil), the use of inorganic salts, fats, oils, and waxes. They are also very strict about preservatives, there are only a couple that they consider microbiologically safe, such as benzyl alcohol and salicylic acid. Lastly, it is forbidden to use radioactive radiation for disinfecting organic raw materials.

Image result for ecocert logo

Eco Cert (France)

Eco Cert has a minimum percentage (%) of organic plant or organic ingredients from plant origin on the total of ingredients validated as plant (ratio: weight on weight). For organic cosmetics, it must be 95% minimum. Apart from this, they also require at least 10% certified organic ingredients vs. the total number of ingredients. They also prohibit contaminants, ionizing treatments, nitrosamins, genetic technology and animal testing. Other factors they consider are: composition of the finished product, conditioning and packing, production, company control system and protection measures.

Image result for icea logo

ICEA (Italy)

ICEA advocates the use of organic or wild plant ingredients, while discouraging usage of environmentally-harmful materials (both in the products and in the packaging) and using ingredients that are allergenic, irritating or may harm human health.  Their certification is equivalent to most trusted European bio-cosmetics certification–the two most important things for them are the health of the people as well as the environment.

Image result for soil association

Soil Association (United Kingdom)

Soil Association recommends the use of local ingredients, to use as high a proportion of organic materials as possible, keep processing to a minimum (to maintain the food’s nutritional value), use as few additives and processing aids as possible and use organic equivalents if available. They also have requirements concerning: grade, composition, quality, quantity and product descriptions.


Take note that in this post, I focused only on health and beauty product certification. These agencies also certify: farming and growing, food and drink, textile, forestry and have different standards for each.

There are several more certification bodies apart from the ones I listed above. Some of them are:

  • Canada Organic
  • Etko (Turkey)
  • Cosmetique Bio (France)
  • Australian Certified Organic
  • BioGro New Zealand
  • Bio Quebec
  • Bio Suisse (Switzerland)
  • Bio-Seigel (Germany)

So next time you are buying organic products, make sure to check the labels and look for the logos of the certifying bodies mentioned above, and you’ll be sure that these products are 100% organic.

Any thoughts? Let me know below!

Organic vs. Natural: What’s the difference?

Although I am loyal to organic products (exhibit A: my blog title), I would also like to share a bit about natural products in this blog. Natural products are also as good as organic products since they are also made with safe ingredients, however, they are not strictly regulated. Many of us probably confuse the two together, so here’s a quick summary of their differences

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Although I am loyal to organic products (exhibit A: my blog title), I would also like to share a bit about natural products in this blog. Natural products are also healthy to use if they are made with good ingredients, however, since they are not strictly regulated, companies may mislead people when they market their product as “natural” even though there is only 1% natural ingredient, and the rest are still harmful ingredients. Many of us probably confuse the two together, so here’s a quick summary of their differences:

Definition

Organic products refer to items that are produced using organic means. Ingredients are grown without the use of pesticides, synthetic fertilizers, genetically modified organisms, ionizing radiation or sewage sludge.

Natural product items can have both organic and natural ingredients but may be minimally synthesized.

Standards

Organic products have strict standards. Different certification bodies such as BDIH, ICEA, ACO, USDA have to inspect the farm where the ingredients were grown, check that the soil is completely chemical-free, and make sure that the farm is following all the rules of organic standards.

Natural products, on the other hand, have no strict rules and regulations. There are only guidelines such as: no use of artificial colors or flavors, no artificial preservatives, no irradiated ingredients, or no GMOs. From my research, only European certification bodies certify natural products such as ICEA, COSMOS, among others.

labels1

Labels

Organic labels usually have a legal implication. As mentioned, there are specified rules and regulations before a manufacturer can use an organic label. However, this is not always the case. Many manufacturers nowadays can claim their product is organic, even though they are not certified.

Natural labels are used freely by manufacturers since there are no specific guidelines on how to claim that a product is natural, only guidelines.

Health Benefits

Organic products are safer than non-organic and natural products since there are zero chemicals used in production and cultivation.

Natural products are safer than non-organic products but some ingredients may be cultivated by using pesticides and fertilizers.

Price

Organic products are generally more expensive than both non-organic and natural products, but with good reason. These products go through so much certification standards, up to the soil used in cultivating the ingredients.

Natural products may be more expensive than non-organic or non-natural products because of the ingredients used.


SO, WHICH IS BETTER?

I am quite biased in saying that organic is always better than natural, but in reality, they are both safe and good for you. One lady I met in Italy told me that all organic products are natural but not all natural products are organic. We don’t need to choose one over the other,  the key is to be vigilant in checking the ingredients and avoiding harmful chemicals which are bad for our health.

Have questions? Feel free to ask me below!

 

Photos from: pinterest.com

Beware of these 10 cosmetic ingredients

I discovered that a lot of the ingredients manufacturers use are not only harmful to my skin but also hazardous to my health. I have found that there are actually thousands of chemical ingredients used in our everyday products–here are the TOP 10 cosmetic ingredients that you should be aware of:

When I was living in Taiwan last year, I had an American flatmate (Hi Alison!) that was vegan. Her passion for veganism sparked an interest in me and she inspired me to do some research about it as well. Soon after, I learned how the food I ate and the products I used were both harmful to myself and the environment (the second factor is a whole other topic in itself, so today I will stick to the first).

One time, Alison shared with me how she couldn’t find a lot of options for vegan products in Taiwan, so she started making her own eyeliner and toothpaste by herself. It was so interesting for me because I then realized how you really only need a couple of ingredients to make these products.

I then did more and more research about the products that I used and discovered that a lot of the ingredients manufacturers use are not only harmful to my skin but also hazardous to my health.

I have found that there are actually thousands of chemical ingredients used in our everyday products. Since I cannot enumerate all of these, here are the TOP 10 cosmetic ingredients that you should be aware of:

Laboratory Glassware

1. Parabens (Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Butylparaben)

These ingredients act as preservatives but have hormone-disrupting effects. When used continuously, parabens can collect in breast tissue and stimulate the growth of breast cancer cells. Furthermore:

  • Ethylparaben adds moisture to the skin but causes headache, weakness, nausea and skin irritation.
  • Propylparaben is usually found in plants and insects. It prevents the growth of bacteria and mold to protect products but there have been studies where this ingredient causes the growth of breast cyst.
  • Butylparaben is tasteless, but it numbs the tongue. It is acidic but antimicrobial and antifungal. The effect is that it mimics estrogen and can act has a hormone system disruptor.

2. Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) / Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES)

SLS and SLES are usually found in shower products such as shampoo, soap and body wash. Additionally, they are also used in oral care products, and in cosmetics. It is a detergent and surfactant, therefore it helps with cleaning. However, it can be contaminated of 1,4-dioxane, which is a known carcinogen. It stays much longer in our bodies, primarily because the liver can’t process it properly. Therefore, this can easily build up in the lungs, brain, heart, and liver.

Other bad effects are: irritation of scalp, gums, and skin, corrosion of skin, hormone imbalance (it increases estrogen for men), causes split hair, frizzy hair, and swelling of face or hands.

3. Cocamide DEA / Cocamide MEA

Cocamide DEA and MEA are not harmful on their own, but when they react with other ingredients, they become carcinogenic. They help with cleansing the skin or hair but causes hair and skin itchiness, dryness, rashes, and eye irritation.

4. Petrolatum

If there is one ingredient that you shouldn’t forget from this list, it’s this one. Petrolatum, when refined (such as petroleum jelly), has no harmful effect on the skin. However, when it is not refined, it may contain PAHs or polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons” that are also found in: burning coal, oil, gasoline, trash, tobacco, wood. This ingredient is mostly used in moisturizers because it helps achieve the sticky formulation, but recent studies have shown that this is actually a cancer-causing ingredient. There’s actually nothing beneficial about this ingredient–it contributes to body contaminants, makes you break out and doesn’t give you any nutrients or hydration. It simply sits there on top of your skin, preventing moisture loss. PASS.

5. Mineral Oil

Mineral oil sounds like it is a good ingredient right? Nope. It’s actually made from petrolatum, and it prevents the skin from eliminating toxins which can lead to acne and other skin disorders. It is usually found in lotions, creams, ointments and makeup products.

6. Propylene Glycol

This is a colorless, creamy liquid that is a byproduct of fossil fuel and fermentation. It hydrates skin and helps active ingredients to penetrate the skin but it causes damage to the kidneys and liver, as well as neurotoxicity to children. Beware also not to get this ingredient to your eye, because it can cause conjunctivitis.

7. Coal Tar Dye

Known as a human carcinogen–it is linked to allergic reactions, dermatitis, asthma attacks, headaches, nausea, fatigue, and nervousness. It also causes major health concerns like cancer and organ toxicity. This is one ingredient that everyone must be careful of because it is usually found in food, textile, cosmetics, and personal care products especially soaps, lotions, shampoos, hair treatments and hair dyes.

8. Sodium Borate or Boric Acid

This ingredient can interfere with hormones and can cause infertility in men. Regular exposure is linked to low sperm counts. The cosmetic industry states that it’s unsafe for infants, yet it is found in some baby care products. This ingredient is already banned in Europe and Canada, but still being widely used in Asian and American made products.

9. Petrochemicals

There are hundreds of chemical ingredients which may be derived from petroluem like butane, propylene, and methane. All of which are classified under petrochemicals, which are byproducts or waste of refining crude oil. When applied to the skin, it doesn’t allow the skin to breathe and can clog pores. There are also some scents that are toxic petrochemicals, which can cause cancers and neurological disorders.

10. UREA

This is an antimicrobial preservative that releases formaldehyde, otherwise known as formalin. This is a very harmful ingredient that causes allergies, asthma, chest pain, joint pain, chronic fatigue, loss of sleep, headache, depression, ear infection. If these reasons are not enough to make you stop using it, it is also linked to major health concerns such as cancer and dermatitis.

Those are my top 10 but in case you are still interested, here are more:

  • Paraffin – can clog pores and cause breakout but often found in face creams and body lotions
  • Carbomer – causes skin irritation
  • Lanolin and its Derivatives – also called as wool fat or wool wax, it is used for protection, treatment, and beautification of the skin–however, it causes major breakouts
  • Methylisothiazolinone / Methylchloroisothiazolinone – a synthetic biocide (a poisonous substance) and preservative that does not give any good effects on the skin
  • Triclosan – linked to skin sensitivity, liver damage, hormone disruption and may cause cancer
  • Fragrance – can trigger allergic reaction, respiratory issues like asthma, headache and hormonal disruption
  • BHT – can cause cancer and interfere with hormone functions
  • Retinol – creates free radicals that increase the risk of skin cancer
  • Siloxane – can interfere with hormone function and damage the liver

 

Credits to Rachel, who helped me in doing research about these ingredients. Thank you. 
Photo from: gigabyte.com

What does “organic” really mean?

Organic is a word that we hear a lot these days — is often linked to other words such as natural, herbal, vegan, healthy among others. More often than not, when we hear that something is labeled organic, we immediately think, “oh, its herbal, its safe… I’ll buy it”

tumblr_nvayr6aggo1u96lapo1_500

Organic is a word that we hear a lot these days — is often linked to other words such as natural, herbal, vegan, healthy among others.  More often than not, when we hear that something is labeled organic, we immediately think, oh, its herbal, its safe… I’ll buy it”

WAIT! Did you read the labels carefully? By definition, the word organic (of food or farming methods) means that there were no chemical fertilizers, pesticides, or other artificial agents used in the production of the product.

or·gan·ic

ôrˈɡanik/

relating to or derived from living matter | synonyms: living, live, animate, biological, biotic | “organic matter”

(of food or farming methods) produced or involving production without the use of chemical fertilizers, pesticides, or other artificial agents | synonyms: pesticide-free, additive-free, natural | “organic vegetables”

In checking if the product you are buying is really organic, you should check which ingredients are NOT used in the product, instead of what was used.

Case and point — it is easy for companies to claim that their product is “organic” because let’s say, they used “organic aloe vera” as an ingredient in the product. Great. However, when you carefully read the ingredients, they used something called “petrolatum”, which is actually a cancer-causing ingredient. Uh oh.

In some other cases, companies say their products do not contain any SLS, parabens or sulfate. But then again, when you carefully read the labels, you will see that they still used one or two harmful ingredients.

This just goes back to what the definition of organic is. Products that are made WITHOUT the use of harmful chemicals, pesticides, additives. 

Therefore, make sure to read all the ingredients and check if they did not use harmful ingredients such as:

  • Petrolatum
  • Paraffin
  • Mineral Oils
  • Sodium Lauryl Sulfate (SLS) / Sodium Laureth Sulfate (SLES)
  • Cocamide DEA / Cocamide MEA
  • Carbomer
  • Lanolin and its Derivatives
  • Propylene Glycol
  • Methylisothiazolinone / Methylchloroisothiazolinone
  • Parabens (Ethylparaben, Propylparaben, Butylparaben)
  • UREA

To learn more about these ingredients, see my next blog post: BEWARE OF THESE 10 COSMETIC INGREDIENTS

Now, who confirms if products are really organic? There are different certification bodies who each have their own standards in assuring that a product is really organic. They go as far as checking the soil used for the planting of ingredients used in the product. Some of the most popular certification bodies for organic products are:

 

  • ICEA (Italy)
  • Soil Association (United Kingdom)
  • Cosmebio (France)
  • Ecocert Greenlife SAS (France)
  • BDIH (Germany)

When you see their logo on the packaging, you are 100% sure that the product is really organic and safe from harmful chemicals. To learn more about this topic, see my next blog post: ORGANIC CERTIFICATION LOGOS TO LOOK FOR

I’m very pleased with the whole “health trend” these days because we are following a trend that is actually GOOD for us. We are starting to take care of our bodies–by exercising and being mindful of what we eat. It’s cool how being “healthy” is such an in thing right now. Anytime we go to the gym or eat an acai bowl, we never fail to instagram it (guilty!), haha.

We have already started being mindful of what we put IN our bodies. I believe that now is the time to also be aware of the things we put ON on our bodies.

How to start? It’s easy: 1) Check the labels, 2) Read the ingredients and finally, 3) Find the certification.

Photo from: pinterest.com